Infra

Breath; talk; ask; think; search; experience; learn; grow; wish; find; doubt; question; understand; know; live.

If kids can’t socialize, who should parents blame? Simple: They should blame themselves. This is the argument advanced in It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, by Microsoft researcher Danah Boyd. Boyd—full disclosure, a friend of mine—has spent a decade interviewing hundreds of teens about their online lives.

What she has found, over and over, is that teenagers would love to socialize face-to-face with their friends. But adult society won’t let them. “Teens aren’t addicted to social media. They’re addicted to each other,” Boyd says. “They’re not allowed to hang out the way you and I did, so they’ve moved it online.”

It’s true. As a teenager in the early ’80s I could roam pretty widely with my friends, as long as we were back by dark. But over the next three decades, the media began delivering a metronomic diet of horrifying but rare child-abduction stories, and parents shortened the leash on their kids. Politicians warned of incipient waves of youth wilding and superpredators (neither of which emerged). Municipalities crafted anti-loitering laws and curfews to keep young people from congregating alone. New neighborhoods had fewer public spaces. Crime rates plummeted, but moral panic soared. Meanwhile, increased competition to get into college meant well-off parents began heavily scheduling their kids’ after-school lives.

The result, Boyd discovered, is that today’s teens have neither the time nor the freedom to hang out. So their avid migration to social media is a rational response to a crazy situation. They’d rather socialize F2F, so long as it’s unstructured and away from grown-ups. “I don’t care where,” one told Boyd wistfully, “just not home.”

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

Leo and Diane Dillon

Various Illustrations

Leo and Diane Dillon were one of the greatest illustration teams in the history of Fantasy Art. Books that have used their illustrations for cover or inside art include an edition of the Narnia books, Garth Nix’s Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen, Her Stories and The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin, Aida by Leontyne Price, The Girl Who Dreamed Only Geese by Howard A. Norman, and many, many more.

There is a blog dedicated to archiving their work here.

(via gigglesandanixi)

tishue:

there’s a group of men on the tv answering a survey about “how much they really know about women” and they asked “which percentage of women do not orgasm from intercourse alone” and they all answered 15 when the real answer was 75 and their faces were just abysmal it gave me life

(via gigglesandanixi)

bubblybobbles:

maariamph:

I saw a hot lady at a grocery store, kinda trying to remember what she looked like
Black people are a small minority in Finland and every time you see one chances are they’re really well dressed

Oh my god O____O WOW

bubblybobbles:

maariamph:

I saw a hot lady at a grocery store, kinda trying to remember what she looked like

Black people are a small minority in Finland and every time you see one chances are they’re really well dressed

Oh my god O____O WOW

(via kikisdeliveryfanservice)

geiszlerrs:

corgabe:

emt-monster:

Please reblog if you know anyone who might take party drugs.

Yo some more helpful tips from another EMT!

1) Its illegal for an EMT to report certain personal information to other non-medical professionals. This includes telling friends your address, whether or not you are HIV positive, and telling the cops about drug use. Thats right, EMTs and paramedics can’t tell the police if you took molly or even if you did illegal activity that’s dangerous to others, like drunk driving. We honestly don’t care if you shot up heroin - we just want to make sure you’re ok. 

2) Do some research on the drugs you’re interested in. There are a lot of websites that have extensive information on drugs, like Erowid, which not only tells you the effects (positive and negative) of the drug, but also the duration and the dose from threshold to heavy. 

3) Be careful with some drugs, like MDMA (ecstasy/molly), which is commonly found in a pressed pill form and can be mixed with a lot of other materials. If you’re thinking about taking molly at a party or rave, I suggest getting it from your (hopefully trusted) dealer beforehand. That way you’re getting it from a trusted source and can also check to see if that particular pill is on Ecstasy Data.

And LSD, while not a usual party drug, can sometimes actually be another similar hallucinogen, like the NBOMe series, which are active to the microgram like acid but is 4x more powerful on blotter paper, and taking this much will cause a bad trip. Acid has a slight metallic taste, or no taste at all, while NBOMe is very bitter. 

4) Many drugs (like stimulants, MDMA, and LSD on occasion) can cause hyperthermia, which is super dangerous if you’re in a place like a rave, surrounded by other hot bodies and dancing for hours without taking a drink. Remember to break for water if this is your situation to avoid this, and if you start to feel feverish and under the weather, cool down immediately. 

Be safe and enjoy!

Also look up all drug interactions before taking anything. Combining certain anti-depressants with certain drugs like ecstasy can cause serotonin syndrome, which can be fatal. 

(via kikisdeliveryfanservice)